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Top of the World

14 Days FROM USD 30,995

Overview

 This incredible adventure starts in Murmansk, Russia. There you embark the nuclear-powered icebreaker 50 Let Pobedy for a roundtrip voyage to the geographic North Pole. Anticipation heightens as the mighty ship takes us smashing through the frozen Arctic Ocean toward our goal.

In addition to the exhilaration of cruising aboard a state-of-the-art icebreaker and the thrill of standing at the top of the world, you also have the opportunity to explore the rarely visited Russian Arctic archipelago of Franz Josef Land. This is an extraordinary voyage on a one-of-a-kind ship, worthy of a true adventurer.

 

Optional Activities :

Trip Code: ACTSTOW

Location: Arctic

Ship: I/B 50 years of Victory

CRUISE ITINERARY

Welcome to the city of Murmansk on Russia’s Kola Peninsula, starting point of our adventure. Upon your arrival at the airport we provide a transfer to your hotel, which has been arranged by us and is included in the price of the voyage.

Murmansk, Russia

Today we provide a group transfer to the port where we welcome you aboard the nuclear-powered icebreaker 50 Years of Victory. Explore the ship and get orientated as we slip our moorings and sail north out of Kola Bay.

Embarkation in Murmansk

Nowhere can it be more truly said that “getting there is half the fun”. As we cruise northward through the Barents Sea there is always the possibility of seeing whales. Meanwhile, you have the opportunity to learn about the unique icebreaking capabilities of the ship. You are also treated to a tour of the engine room.

As we make our way across the ice cap, you witness firsthand the ship’s awesome power as massive ice blocks give way under the enormous bulk of the spoon-shaped bow. The sensation of being on deck at this time is surreal and unforgettable.

We also take advantage of 24-hour daylight to offer helicopter flightseeing tours. From the air you can observe the ship crushing a path through the ice. You also have a unique vantage point from which to witness the stunning beauty of this vast polar icescape.

The Voyage North - Day 3 to 6

Welcome to the geographic North Pole! After carefully navigating to 90 degrees North, we ceremoniously drop the anchor on a sturdy stretch of ice and disembark onto the frozen sea.

Now is the time to experience the long-anticipated thrill of standing at the top of the world. Join hands with your fellow passengers and literally walk around the world during our special International Round Dance. You are also treated to a barbeque meal on the ice. You may even have the chance to take a plunge into the icy water!

After our memorable time at the North Pole we turn around and head south. But the adventure is not over yet. The High Arctic archipelago of Franz Josef Land is still to come!

North Pole

The Franz Josef Land archipelago, part of the Russian Arctic National Park since 2012, is a nature sanctuary. Polar bears and other quintessential High Arctic wildlife—such as walruses and some rare whale species—can be spotted anytime, anywhere in and around Franz Josef Land. Scree slopes and cliffs around the islands host enormous nesting colonies of migratory seabirds such as guillemots, dovekies, and ivory gulls. We take advantage of 24-hour daylight to exploit every opportunity for wildlife viewing and excursions via Zodiac and helicopter.

Franz Josef Land is home to some interesting geological features, such as the mysterious stone spheres on Champ Island. Collectors of geographical extremes may take note that Cape Fligely on Rudolf Island is the northernmost point of land in the Eastern Hemisphere.

Franz Josef Land also offers visitors the opportunity to walk in the footsteps of famous polar explorers at well-preserved historical sites. The journals of explorers such as Julius von Payer, Benjamin Leigh Smith, Frederick George Jackson, and Fridtjof Nansen come alive at Cape Norway, Cape Flora, Eira Harbour, and Cape Tegetthoff. Memorials, monuments, crosses, and the remains of dwellings are testimony to incredible historical events that are further illuminated by our expert lecturers.

Tikhaya Bukhta is currently a Russian Arctic National Park ranger station occupying Soviet-era research buildings and was also a major base for polar expeditions. Nearby, the fascinating columnar basalt cliffs of Rubini Rock are home to thousands of nesting seabirds.

Exploration of Franz Josef Land - Day 8 to 10

After our amazing time in Franz Josef Land we cross back south through the bountiful waters of the Barents Sea. Presentations and workshops by our expert staff ensure that these days at sea are not idly spent. You may also take advantage of onboard facilities and amenities such as a polar library, volleyball court, gym, two saunas, warm seawater pool, gift shop, and massage treatments. Seabird viewing and whale sightings can be enjoyed from panoramic open decks as well as exterior stateroom windows.

The Voyage South - Day 11 & 12

After breakfast on board we say farewell in Murmansk. We provide you with a transfer to the airport or to the city center.

Disembarkation in Murmansk
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Pricing & date

Top of the World from USD 30,995
Departing Ending Duration
12 Jul 2020 25 Jul 2020 14
23 Jul 2020 05 Aug 2020 14
03 Aug 2020 16 Aug 2020 14
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Important Information

  • 1 night pre-cruise hotel accommodation in Murmansk, Russia, with breakfast;
    Transfer from airport to the hotel in Murmansk 1 day prior to departure;
    Transfer from hotel to the port in Murmansk on embarkation day;
    Transfer from the port to the airport or central location in Murmansk upon disembarkation;
    Shipboard accommodation with housekeeping;
    Shipboard breakfasts, lunches and dinners;
    Coffee, tea and cocoa available around the clock;
    All shore excursions and activities throughout the voyage by helicopter;
    All shore excursions and activities throughout the voyage by zodiacs;
    Shore landings included in daily program;
    Program of lectures and informal discussions by experienced Expedition Team and guest lecturers;
    Professional Expedition Leadership;
    Expeditions parka;
    Rubber boots for shore landings for the time of the cruise;
    Informative pre-departure materials;
    Digital Voyage Log;
    All miscellaneous service taxes and port charges throughout the program;
    All shipboard luggage handling;
    Personalized medical insurance covering the risks of evacuation and repatriation. Coverage: 100,000 EUR. Duration: cruise days only. This is only for passengers under 85 years old. Passengers over 85 years old are to purchase their own insurance policy with coverage not less than 100,000 EUR;
    Letter of Invitation. This document should be presented to the Russian Consulate in your area in order to obtain a Russian Visa. Please, contact the Russian Consulate to learn more about the procedure for obtaining a Russian Visa. 

     

    Exclusions:

    Airfare to and from your hometown to Murmansk;
    Helicopter flying time in excess of that offered for the group;
    Passport and visa expenses (if required); A RUSSIAN VISA IS REQUIRED FOR THE TRIP. THE VISA MUST BE OBTAINED BY THE CUSTOMER AND IS AT HIS OR HER EXPENSE. Please, contact your local Russian Consulate to learn more about the procedure for obtaining a Russian Visa.
    State arrival and departure taxes (if levied);
    Meals ashore and supplements in respect of single hotel accommodation (if required);
    Excess luggage charges on international and local flights;
    Telecommunication services; laundry, bar and beverage charges aboard the vessel;
    Luggage, cancellation insurance (strongly recommended);
    Tips for stewards and other service personnel aboard (at your discretion).

  • 2 (light adventure)
  • Available upon request

  • Itinerary, landings and all other activities during the cruise depend strongly on ice and weather conditions and are subject to the decisions of the Expedition Leader and the Captain of the vessel. Encounters with any mentioned wildlife cannot be guaranteed.

    Contact us for more details

  • Season and availability

SPEAK TO A SPECIALIST

Talk to one of our Destination Specialists to plan your South American adventure and turn your dream into a reality. With exceptional knowledge and first hand experience, our consultants will assist in every way possible to make your journey the most memorable it can be, matching not only the itinerary, but the accommodation and activities to suit your style of travel and budget.

Sustainability

GUIDANCE FOR VISITORS TO THE ANTARCTIC

RECOMMENDATION XVIII-1, ADOPTED AT THE ANTARCTIC TREATY MEETING, KYOTO, 1994

Activities in the Antarctic are governed by the Antarctic Treaty of 1959 and associated agreements, referred to collectively as the Antarctic Treaty System. The Treaty established Antarctica as a zone of peace and science.

In 1991, the Antarctic Treaty Consultative Parties adopted the Protocol on Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty, which designates the Antarctic as a natural reserve. The Protocol sets out environmental principles, procedures and obligations for the comprehensive protection of the Antarctic environment, and its dependent and associated ecosystems. The Consultative Parties have agreed that as far as possible and in accordance with their legal system, the provisions of the Protocol should be applied as appropriate. The Environmental Protocol was ratified in January 1998.

The Environmental Protocol applies to tourism and non-governmental activities, as well as governmental activities in the Antarctic Treaty Area. It is intended to ensure that these activities, do not have adverse impacts on the Antarctic environment, or on its scientific and aesthetic values.
This Guidance for Visitors to the Antarctic is intended to ensure that all visitors are aware of, and are therefore able to comply with, the Treaty and the Protocol. Visitors are, of course, bound by national laws and regulations applicable to activities in the Antarctic.


PROTECT ANTARCTIC WILDLIFE

Taking or harmful interference with Antarctic wildlife is prohibited except in accordance with a permit issued by a national authority.

Do not use aircraft, vessels, small boats, or other means of transport in ways that disturb wildlife, either at sea or on land.
Do not feed, touch, or handle birds or seals, or approach or photograph them in ways that cause them to alter their behavior. Special care is needed when animals are breeding or molting.
Do not damage plants, for example by walking, driving, or landing on extensive moss beds or lichen-covered scree slopes.
Do not use guns or explosives. Keep noise to the minimum to avoid frightening wildlife.
Do not bring non-native plants or animals into the Antarctic, such as live poultry, pet dogs and cats, or house plants.


RESPECT PROTECTED AREAS

A variety of areas in the Antarctic have been afforded special protection because of their particular ecological, scientific, historic, or other values. Entry into certain areas may be prohibited except in accordance with a permit issued by an appropriate national authority.
Activities in and near designated Historic Sites and Monuments and certain other areas may be subject to special restrictions.

Know the locations of areas that have been afforded special protection and any restrictions regarding entry and activities that can be carried out in and near them.
Observe applicable restrictions.
Do not damage, remove, or destroy Historic Sites or Monuments or any artifacts associated with them.

RESPECT SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH

Do not interfere with scientific research, facilities or equipment.

Obtain permission before visiting Antarctic science and support facilities; reconfirm arrangements 24-72 hours before arrival; and comply with the rules regarding such visits.
Do not interfere with, or remove, scientific equipment or marker posts, and do not disturb experimental study sites, field camps, or supplies.
BE SAFE

Be prepared for severe and changeable weather and ensure that your equipment and clothing meet Antarctic standards. Remember that the Antarctic environment is inhospitable, unpredictable, and potentially dangerous.

Know your capabilities and the dangers posed by the Antarctic environment, and act accordingly. Plan activities with safety in mind at all times.
Keep a safe distance from all wildlife, both on land and at sea.
Take note of, and act on, the advice and instructions from your leaders; do not stray from your group.
Do not walk onto glaciers or large snow fields without the proper equipment and experience; there is a real danger of falling into hidden crevasses.
Do not expect a rescue service. Self-sufficiency is increased and risks reduced by sound planning, quality equipment, and trained personnel.
Do not enter emergency refuges (except in emergencies). If you use equipment or food from a refuge, inform the nearest research station or national authority once the emergency is over.
Respect any smoking restrictions, particularly around buildings, and take great care to safeguard against the danger of fire. This is a real hazard in the dry environment of Antarctica.

KEEP ANTARCTICA PRISTINE

Antarctica remains relatively pristine, the largest wilderness area on Earth. It has not yet been subjected to large-scale human perturbations. Please keep it that way.

Do not dispose of litter or garbage on land. Open burning is prohibited.
Do not disturb or pollute lakes or streams. Any materials discarded at sea must be disposed of properly.
Do not paint or engrave names or graffiti on rocks or buildings.
Do not collect or take away biological or geological specimens or man-made artifacts as a souvenir, including rocks, bones, eggs, fossils, and parts or contents of buildings.
Do not deface or vandalize buildings or emergency refuges, whether occupied, abandoned, or unoccupied.​​