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Arctic Express: Greenland's Northern Lights

10 Days FROM AUD 8,800

Overview

For those short on time, the benefits of this expedition are many. You’ll witness the delights of the world’s largest fjord system of Scoresby Sund, discover the fascinating Inuit settlements and people of Ittoqqortoormiit, and have the possibility of viewing some of the world’s most vivid displays of Northern Lights. As one of our more active adventures, you’ll have the chance to trek along the tundra and at Greenland National Park, climb mountains and watch grazing musk ox and other arctic wildlife on the horizon.

Optional Activities :

Trip Code: ACTSGNL

Location: Greenland

Ship: Ocean Nova

CRUISE ITINERARY

Your adventure begins with an overnight stay in thoroughly modern Reykjavik, the world’s northernmost capital city.

Reykjavik, Iceland

You’ll fly from Reykjavik to Constable Point to board your vessel and begin your expedition. Get ready for a great adventure ahead!

Embarkation Day at Constable Point

You’ll cruise through breathtaking Alpefjord. Fjords punctuate the scenery all around. Your day will be spent exploring and Zodiac cruising through a multitude of dazzling icebergs, fjords and sounds in all shapes and sizes. Be on the lookout for arctic fox and musk ox, which roam free here.

Apelfjord

You’ll view colorful vistas, and fascinating geology. Later, you’ll travel to the impressive and rarely visited Waltershausen Glacier, an imposing ice floe at the head of Nordfjord, named after German explorer Baron Wolfgang Sartorius von Waltershausen, after his failed 1869 attempt to reach the North Pole via East Greenland.

Brogetdal and Watershausen Glacier

Blomsterbugten, the “Bay of Flowers,” is home to beautiful purple and gold colored rocks that you’ll view from a distance, or on a hike for those who wish. Later we’ll continue to Renbugten, called “Reindeer Bay” for the herd of 12 reindeer seen on one of the first expeditions to the area. Arctic hare are a common and delightful sight in this area.

Blomsterbugten and Renbugten

Ella Oya is a hiker’s paradise. The area is surrounded by ice-choked waters, rugged cliffs and sky-blue icebergs. Challenge yourself with a climb to the top of the island—the views are worth it.

Ella Oya (Ella Island)

At the start of the sound, Itoqqortoormiit is East Greenland’s most northerly community and boasts a blend of traditional and modern lifestyles. With clear skies, you’ll have a great opportunity to see the northern lights.

Ittoqqortoormiit and Hall Bredning

Sailing on, deeper into Scoresby Sund you’ll encounter massive icebergs and an ancient Thule settlement as we approach Sydkap. The scenery here is unforgettable, with towering mountain sides and hundreds of monumental icebergs playing tricks with your sense of perception.

Frederiksdal and Sydkap

Arrive at Constable Point and disembark the ship. Sit back and enjoy your charter flight from Constable Point to Reykjavik, the vibrant and artistic capital of Iceland. Overnight in your comfortable Reykjavik hotel.

Disembarkation at Constable Point

Make your own way to the airport for your return flight home, or spend some extra time in Reykjavik - you’ll be amazed at the variety of attractions and must-see places of interests Reykjavik has to offer.

Depart Reykjavik
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Pricing & date

Arctic Express: Greenland's Northern Lights from AUD 8,800
Departing Ending Duration
02 Sep 2019 11 Sep 2019 10
09 Sep 2019 18 Sep 2019 10
16 Sep 2019 25 Sep 2019 10
23 Sep 2019 02 Oct 2019 10
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Important Information

  • Shipboard accommodation with daily housekeeping
    All breakfasts, lunches, dinners and snacks on board
    All shore landings per the daily program
    Leadership throughout the voyage by our experienced Expedition Leader
    All Zodiac transfers and cruising per the daily program
    Formal and informal presentations by our Expedition Team and special guests as scheduled
    Photographic journal documenting the expedition
    Waterproof expedition boots on loan for shore landings
    Expeditions parka to keep
    Coffee, tea and cocoa available around the clock
    Hair dryer and bathrobe in every cabin
    Comprehensive pre-departure materials, including a map and an informative Arctic Reader
    All miscellaneous service taxes and port charges throughout the program
    All luggage handling aboard the ship
    Emergency evacuation insurance to a maximum benefit of US$100,000 per person
    Greenland voyages cruise passenger tax
    One night’s pre-expedition hotel accommodation in Reykjavik with breakfast
    Group transfer from Reykjavik hotel to domestic airport on embarkation day
    Charter flight from Reykjavik to Constable Point on embarkation day

    Group transfers to and from ship

    Charter flight from Constable Point to Reykjavik domestic airport on disembarkation day
    Group transfer from domestic airport to Reykjavik hotel
    One night’s post-expedition hotel accommodation in Reykjavik with breakfast


    EXCLUDES
    International airfare
    Passport and visa expenses
    Government arrival and departure taxes not mentioned above
    Meals ashore unless otherwise specified
    Baggage, cancellation, interruption and medical travel insurance—strongly recommended
    Excess-baggage fees on international flights
    Mandatory waterproof pants for Zodiac cruising, or any other gear not mentioned
    Laundry, bar, beverage and other personal charges unless specified
    Phone and Internet charges
    Voluntary gratuity at the end of the voyage for shipboard staff and crew
    Additional overnight accommodation
    Optional kayaking activities
    Arrival and departure transfers between Reykjavik international airport and hotel on arrival and departure days

  • Available upon request

  • Baggage allowance on charter flight is 33 lbs (15 kg) checked and 11 lbs (5 kg) carry-on

    Contact us for more details

  • Season and availability

SPEAK TO A SPECIALIST

Talk to one of our Destination Specialists to plan your South American adventure and turn your dream into a reality. With exceptional knowledge and first hand experience, our consultants will assist in every way possible to make your journey the most memorable it can be, matching not only the itinerary, but the accommodation and activities to suit your style of travel and budget.

Sustainability

GUIDANCE FOR VISITORS TO THE ANTARCTIC

RECOMMENDATION XVIII-1, ADOPTED AT THE ANTARCTIC TREATY MEETING, KYOTO, 1994

Activities in the Antarctic are governed by the Antarctic Treaty of 1959 and associated agreements, referred to collectively as the Antarctic Treaty System. The Treaty established Antarctica as a zone of peace and science.

In 1991, the Antarctic Treaty Consultative Parties adopted the Protocol on Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty, which designates the Antarctic as a natural reserve. The Protocol sets out environmental principles, procedures and obligations for the comprehensive protection of the Antarctic environment, and its dependent and associated ecosystems. The Consultative Parties have agreed that as far as possible and in accordance with their legal system, the provisions of the Protocol should be applied as appropriate. The Environmental Protocol was ratified in January 1998.

The Environmental Protocol applies to tourism and non-governmental activities, as well as governmental activities in the Antarctic Treaty Area. It is intended to ensure that these activities, do not have adverse impacts on the Antarctic environment, or on its scientific and aesthetic values.
This Guidance for Visitors to the Antarctic is intended to ensure that all visitors are aware of, and are therefore able to comply with, the Treaty and the Protocol. Visitors are, of course, bound by national laws and regulations applicable to activities in the Antarctic.


PROTECT ANTARCTIC WILDLIFE

Taking or harmful interference with Antarctic wildlife is prohibited except in accordance with a permit issued by a national authority.

Do not use aircraft, vessels, small boats, or other means of transport in ways that disturb wildlife, either at sea or on land.
Do not feed, touch, or handle birds or seals, or approach or photograph them in ways that cause them to alter their behavior. Special care is needed when animals are breeding or molting.
Do not damage plants, for example by walking, driving, or landing on extensive moss beds or lichen-covered scree slopes.
Do not use guns or explosives. Keep noise to the minimum to avoid frightening wildlife.
Do not bring non-native plants or animals into the Antarctic, such as live poultry, pet dogs and cats, or house plants.


RESPECT PROTECTED AREAS

A variety of areas in the Antarctic have been afforded special protection because of their particular ecological, scientific, historic, or other values. Entry into certain areas may be prohibited except in accordance with a permit issued by an appropriate national authority.
Activities in and near designated Historic Sites and Monuments and certain other areas may be subject to special restrictions.

Know the locations of areas that have been afforded special protection and any restrictions regarding entry and activities that can be carried out in and near them.
Observe applicable restrictions.
Do not damage, remove, or destroy Historic Sites or Monuments or any artifacts associated with them.

RESPECT SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH

Do not interfere with scientific research, facilities or equipment.

Obtain permission before visiting Antarctic science and support facilities; reconfirm arrangements 24-72 hours before arrival; and comply with the rules regarding such visits.
Do not interfere with, or remove, scientific equipment or marker posts, and do not disturb experimental study sites, field camps, or supplies.
BE SAFE

Be prepared for severe and changeable weather and ensure that your equipment and clothing meet Antarctic standards. Remember that the Antarctic environment is inhospitable, unpredictable, and potentially dangerous.

Know your capabilities and the dangers posed by the Antarctic environment, and act accordingly. Plan activities with safety in mind at all times.
Keep a safe distance from all wildlife, both on land and at sea.
Take note of, and act on, the advice and instructions from your leaders; do not stray from your group.
Do not walk onto glaciers or large snow fields without the proper equipment and experience; there is a real danger of falling into hidden crevasses.
Do not expect a rescue service. Self-sufficiency is increased and risks reduced by sound planning, quality equipment, and trained personnel.
Do not enter emergency refuges (except in emergencies). If you use equipment or food from a refuge, inform the nearest research station or national authority once the emergency is over.
Respect any smoking restrictions, particularly around buildings, and take great care to safeguard against the danger of fire. This is a real hazard in the dry environment of Antarctica.

KEEP ANTARCTICA PRISTINE

Antarctica remains relatively pristine, the largest wilderness area on Earth. It has not yet been subjected to large-scale human perturbations. Please keep it that way.

Do not dispose of litter or garbage on land. Open burning is prohibited.
Do not disturb or pollute lakes or streams. Any materials discarded at sea must be disposed of properly.
Do not paint or engrave names or graffiti on rocks or buildings.
Do not collect or take away biological or geological specimens or man-made artifacts as a souvenir, including rocks, bones, eggs, fossils, and parts or contents of buildings.
Do not deface or vandalize buildings or emergency refuges, whether occupied, abandoned, or unoccupied.​​

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