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Antarctica History and Resources

Who first discovered Antarctica? Who first reached the South Pole? Learn more about the incredible history of Antarctica and it's many explorers including ShackletonMawson, Amundsen, Scott and Ross. 

Map of Antarctica: from Greek Myth to Google Street View

Creating a Map of Antarctica has been a challenge for man for over a century. Learn about all the seemingly insurmountable challenges which cartographers still face nowadays, in one of the harshest and enigmatic places on earth. Almost twice the size of Australia, and covering an astonishing area of 14,000,000 square kilometres, Antarctica is the fifth-largest continent in the world. …

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Charles Wilkes – The Story of an Antarctic Explorer

Charles Wilkes  was an American naval officer, ship’s captain, and explorer famous for this exploring expedition to Antarctica. In 1821 the attention of a fledgling United States Congress was drawn to stories of discovery, drama and derring-do in the south seas involving the lawless community of New England sealers.The House of Representatives debated a motion to fund a voyage of …

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Politics in Antarctica – Territorial Claims

Territorial claims – who owns Antarctica? Standing at the South Pole in December 1911 Roald Amundsen claimed the polar plateau for Norway’s King Haakon – surely his right as he was the first there? But in 1909 Ernest Shackleton, just short of the Pole and having pioneered the route to find it, had already raised the flag and taken possession …

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Politics in Antarctica – The Antarctic Treaty

At a certain moment there were at least 10 permanent research stations on Antarctica. But whose law would apply? This question led to the establishment of the Antarctic Treaty, a set of international agreements established in 1961 which lead to the solution of the sovereignty issue in Antarctica. Whose law applies? By the early 1950s, territorial claims in Antarctica had …

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Climate in Antarctica – how it made- and unmade the continent

The Climate in Antarctica makes the continent the way it is. Over 15 million years it has transformed rocky lands with forests and grasslands into a continent of ice. In years to come, the Climate in Antarctica will again radically transform it. For many millions of years, when Antarctica formed part of a supercontinent called Gondwana, the land around the …

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The History of Antarctica – A Story of Great Explorers

Who first saw Antarctic ice, and who first discovered Antarctica? Europeans are used to putting a person’s name to such things, such as “Christopher Columbus discovered America” (he didn’t, actually), but the discoverers of Antarctica could well be nameless individuals from the Pacific. So here is the story about the History of Antarctica: The History of Antarctica We know the …

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Further Reading on Antarctica- Books and Websites

Want to do some Further Reading on Antarctica? These are our recommendations to read: Further Reading on Antarctica- Books Below the Convergence: Voyages Towards Antarctica – Alan Gurney   End of the Earth: Voyaging to Antarctica – Peter Matthiessen In Search of the South Pole – Kari Herbert and Huw Lewis Race for the South Pole: The Expedition Diaries of Scott …

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Weather in Antarctica: cold today, cold again tomorrow

The Weather in Antarctica  is nearly always very cold. That’s obvious when we see its place on the globe – the South and North Poles never get much heat energy from the sun – but Antarctica is much colder than the North Pole. Unlike the Arctic, Antarctica is a high land mass surrounded by a cold Southern Ocean, and higher …

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What is the difference between the Arctic and Antarctica

Aside the fact that they are on opposite ends of our planet, the difference between the Arctic and Antarctica is quite substantial. The most fundamental one, by which all others evolved, is that Antarctica is a bona fide continent – it is an ice-covered landmass surrounded by water as far as the eye can see – whereas the Arctic is a …

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The Geography of Antarctica

Stand at the North Pole and, if you are lucky, you will be standing on a layer of ice. If you are still lucky it may be 2 metres thick, otherwise, you’ll be treading water 4 kilometres deep. Stand at the South Pole and you will be on solid ground – well, solid ice over 2800 metres thick. Read on …

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