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Into The Northwest Passage

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Overview

COMBINATION DISCOUNT: Combine with High Arctic Explorer to receive up to 25% off*

Welcome to the Northwest Passage. This is one of the world’s most epic Arctic journeys and will take you through fjords, icebergs, glaciers and historic sites. Look out for the wildlife which call this route home: polar bears, seabirds and marine mammals. You will sail aboard the spacious Ocean Endeavour for 17 days which allows plenty of time to relax into life at sea. Excursions include visits to Nunavut’s communities, hiking, photography, bird watching and there will be lectures from the onboard team of experts. This itinerary will take you to the top of the world, starting in Toronto, flying to Kangerlussuag, Greenland and ending in Kugluktuk, Nunavut, Canada, before your flight to Calgary. 

Optional Activities :

Trip Code: ACADTNP

Travel Style: Expedition Cruise

Location: Arctic

Ship: The Ocean Endeavour

CRUISE ITINERARY

Please make your own way to Toronto Airport for the early morning charter flight to Kangerlussuaq.

Kangerlussuaq is a former US Air Force base and Greenland’s primary flight hub. After our charter flight from Toronto, we will be bused along Greenland’s longest road—less than twenty kilometres—to the port. Zodiacs will be waiting to transfer us to the Ocean Endeavour.

Sondre Stromfjord is one of the longest fjords in the world and boasts 168 kilometres of superb scenery. We begin our adventure by sailing down this dramatic fjord, crossing the Arctic Circle as we go.

Toronto - Kangerlussuaq

People have lived in the Sisimiut area for 4,500 years. For the first 2,000 years, the people of the Saqqaq culture occupied the area. Approximately 2,500 years ago, new people brought the Dorset culture to the Sisimiut area. They lived here for 1,500 years and were followed by the people of the Thule culture—the ancestors of the current population. All these cultures came from Canada.

The people primarily lived on fish, birds and mammals such as whales and seals. The ice-free conditions in the sea around Sisimiut, including some of Greenland’s deepest fjords, allow us to sail in waters that are home to many whales and seals.

Sisimiut Coast

Ilulissat translates literally into “iceberg”, an apt name for this site at the mouth of the Ilulissat Icefjord—a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The icefjord is the outlet of the Sermeq Kujalleq glacier, source of many of the icebergs in the north Atlantic.

Here, we will cruise in our fleet of Zodiacs to appreciate the icebergs. And we’ll also visit the bustling town of Ilulissat, with its museums, cafes, craft shops, and busy fishing harbour.

Ilulissat

Our adventure builds as we explore by ship and Zodiac along the west coast of Greenland. Here we find spectacular fjords, where we will be watching for marine life in majestic and inspiring landscapes dotted with icebergs.

We have numerous options for expedition stops, to make the most of weather and wildlife conditions. Departing Greenland, we cross Baffin Bay toward Nunavut, Canada. Our onboard presentation schedule will have us learning as we go.

Western Greenland - Day 4 to 5

As we steam toward Nunavut, our resource staff will deepen your understanding of the Arctic. This is an excellent time to enjoy workshops, watch a documentary, or get out on deck. Keep your binoculars ready for minke and humpback whales, as well as the seabirds that are sure to mark our passage.

At Sea - Davis Strait

Mittimatalik is a busy Arctic community in a beautiful setting, a fascinating place to wander. The cultural presentation at the Community Hall is not to be missed—arts and crafts may be available here too.

Mittimatalik (Pond Inlet)

We will spend three days exploring Tallurutiup Imanga (Lancaster Sound), one of the newest National Marine Conservation Areas in Nunavut. Narwhal, beluga, and bowhead whales transit and feed in this area. We’ll cruise by ship and Zodiac in search of wildlife.

On the northern border of Tallurutiup Imanga lies Devon Island, the largest uninhabited island on Earth at over fifty thousand square kilometres. Flat topped mountains, glacial valleys, and a substantial ice cap give Devon Island its unique character. We hike the tundra, cruise a glacier face, and seek wildlife from ship and by shore. Archaeological sites with expert interpretation allow us to learn about the Inuit history of this now-abandoned island. We’ll visit the remains of a RCMP and Hudson's Bay Company site at Dundas Harbour.

East Baffin Island - Day 8 to 10

In 1845, Sir John Franklin set out from England with HMS Erebus and Terror, attempting to sail through the Northwest Passage. Franklin’s party overwintered at Beechey Island—where three of his men died.

Numerous search parties later used Beechey as a depot and rendezvous. Amundsen, Bernier, and Larsen visited Beechey. Thomas Morgan of the HMS Investigator was buried there in 1854 alongside Franklin’s men. The graves and the ruins of Northumberland House are a haunting memorial.

Beechey Island

This passage marks an area rich in marine and avian life. Thick-billed Murres, Ivory Gulls, beluga, narwhal and bowhead whales reside in the ice-strewn waters. In addition to abundant wildlife, we’ll delve deeper into the exploration of the Northwest Passage and mercantile efforts of the Hudson's Bay Company.

Prince Regent Inlet - Day 12 to 13

The Kitikmeot Region consists of parts of Victoria Island, the adjacent part of the mainland as far as the Boothia Peninsula, King William Island, and the southern portion of Prince of Wales Island. Its regional seat is Iqaluktuuttiaq (Cambridge Bay), though it also contains five other hamlets.

Recently, the Kitikmeot Region has been in the news since the finding of the lost ships of the Franklin Expedition in its waters. It is Nunavut’s least-populated region, though wildlife abounds here both in the sea and on land.

Kitikmeot Region - Day 14 to 16

Located at the mouth of the Coppermine River, Kugluktuk is the westernmost community in Nunavut. Known for many years as Coppermine, the community reverted to its original Inuinnaqtun name—meaning “place of moving waters”—on January 1, 1996.

The Coppermine River is designated a Canadian Heritage River for the important role it played as an exploration and fur trade route. Today we will disembark the Ocean Endeavour and make our way to the airport to meet our charter flights to Calgary.

Kugluktuk - Calgary
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Pricing & date

Departing Ending Duration
22 Aug 2020 07 Sep 2020 17
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Important Information

  • Inclusions

    All accommodation on board the Ocean Endeavour

    All onboard meals 

    One way Charter Flight Toronto to Kangerlussuaq on Day 1

    One way Charter Flight Kugluktuk to Calgary on Day 17

    Applicable taxes and credit card fees

    Complimentary expedition jacket 

    Special access permits and entry fees

    Port fees 

    All zodiac excursions and interactive workshops 

    Exclusions 

    Gratuities 

    Mandatory medical evacuation insurance 

    Additional expenses due to delays or itinerary changes 

    Possible fuel surcharges 

    Pre and post trip accommodation. 

  • 2 (light adventure)
  • Please Note: Category 3 to 7 cabins have no single supplement. Contact us for more details. 

  • Contact us for more details

  • Season and availability 

SPEAK TO A SPECIALIST

Sustainability

Being environmentally accountable is a crucial part of our organisation. Chimu is currently striving towards using less paper, taking several initiatives to do so and tracking our progress along the way. Our goal: A paperless organisation. For this reason, all information given to you will be sent electronically. We encourage those who choose to travel with us to support our aspirations and actions and ask that you reconsider printing out documentation. To view these documents, you can download them to your iPad or portable computer before and during your trip.

Chimu is passionate and dedicated to sustainability measures and understands the crucial part sustainability plays within the tourism industry.

We use local guides and office staff to both maximise local employment opportunities and minimise carbon footprint. Local guides also ensure you benefit from the intimate knowledge, passion and culture of the country you’re visiting. Our guides are all highly qualified (most with university degrees) or equip with many years of experience and are paid above the standard wage. Whether it be our knowledgeable local guides, locally produced meals or the transport on tour, we do not use imported goods when local products are available. We aim to minimise our impact on the environment and give as much back as possible to the communities we work in.

The Ocean Endeavour in the Arctic works closley with the First Nations communities by direct employment and is a part of a Discovery Fund. Every customer contributes directly to the Fund when they purchase a trip to the Arctic. The Fund covers issues like habitat enhancement, youth outreach, community support and charity projects. The Scientist-in-residence program offers spacem time and resources aborad The Ocean Edneavoru for parcticing scientists and researches. Passenger contributions to the citizen science program is also facilitate onboard. While visiting the many national parks, heritage sites, museums and landmarks our travellers are encouraged to explore whilst remaining culturally aware and sensitive. We further encourage you to buy appropriate souvenirs and discourage the buying of anything wrongfully made or taken from the environment i.e. shells and endangered species products. Information on how you can be environmentally conscious, and travel responsibly will be made available in our Travellers Guides and provided during your travels by guides and staff.

For more information on our sustainability policies, including how we are striving towards being a paperless organisation, click HERE